Signpost Local Marketing Blog

Meet Mia: A New Way To Connect With Customers

Mia automated marketing

Last month Mia was born. You might have read about it in some leading media outlets, but now that she’s arrived, we wanted to introduce you to her ourselves. Drum roll, please…

Mia is the world’s first artificially intelligent marketing assistant, and she enables you to connect with customers in a new way. Collecting emails, phone numbers and purchase information for your previous, current and future customers,  Mia creates robust profiles that allow her to keep track of their activity, preferences and behaviors.

Best of all, this data empowers Mia to automatically send the perfect messages to the right customers at the right time to keep them engaged and your business top-of-mind. These targeted emails and text messages drive feedback, testimonials, 5-star reviews, customer loyalty and referrals. All without having to lift a finger!

With data on more than 16 million US consumers across more than 6,000 Signpost customers, Mia is continuously learning and identifying new patterns that allow her to optimize your marketing efforts. She bridges a particularly tricky gap for all those without an advanced degree in data science or the budget for exorbitant analytical tools, but who still want to reap the benefits of a data-driven approach to customer acquisition and retention. Mia is constantly honing her skills and reporting the results, so you can rest assured that she’s working hard to deliver the best outcomes for your business’s bottom line.

Find out how Mia can drive outcomes for your business, today! 

Nail Salons: Creating a Referral Program That Works

May is Salon Month here on the Signpost Local Marketing Blog! This means that in addition to our usual posts with tips on connecting with customers, marketing strategy, and growing your business, we’ll be sharing insights specifically for local salon professionals. If that includes you, it’s time to polish up on these proven promotion techniques. If not, don’t worry, we’ll still be sharing our usual resources that can help you effectively market your local business. And keep your eyes peeled, your industry might be the one we feature next month!

Download The Complete Salon Marketing Checklist


promoting my salon

Referrals are the best gift a business owner can receive. Unfortunately, far too often they’re treated as just that, instead of a customer acquisition technique that requires its own strategy in order to be truly effective. Comprising 65% of all new business, referrals are also 4 times more likely to buy than other prospective customers. With such valuable prospects, it’s even more important to think through the entire process from start to finish, so you can encourage your customers to take various actions throughout. You’ll find that when you cultivate a referrals mindset, you can drive even more business by leveraging your existing customers. We’ve outlined the best way to start the process, along with tips for asking and creative campaigns to drive more referrals.

Selecting Incentives

Calculating Customer Value

First, it’s important to evaluate the value of your average client. Dive into your customer data to answer the following questions:

  1. What is the typical purchase amount?referrals for nail salons
  2. What is the typical purchase frequency? (How often do they come in?)
  3. What is the typical customer time period for repeat business? (How long do they keep returning?)

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Using Online Scheduling to Keep Your Business Organized

In our guest post series, we’ll be bringing you advice and tips from industry experts on the other, sometimes non-marketing-related issues affecting local business owners. Today’s post comes from Robert Ravensbergen, Content Marketer and Digital Communications Specialist at Agendize.


Everyday there’s some newfangled software that purports to make it “easy”, “efficient” or even “fun” to manage and grow your business. Ultimately most of these implementations take time, energy, and don’t often show you the quick returns yours small-but-fast-moving business needs to make a name for itself.

However, Online Scheduling’s track record has proven to be wildly different from that grow your business using online schedulingunfortunate norm. Not only does 24/7 Online Booking often mean as much as 40% more appointments for businesses, but it also leads to as much as 75% time save on managing appointments, an 80% reduction in no-shows, and the elimination of double-bookings. With Online Scheduling, a few simple features make keeping your business organized easy – this on top of giving your clients a natural and intuitive way to book appointments in seconds.

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Hair Salons: Creating a Powerful Online Presence

May is Salon Month here on the Signpost Local Marketing Blog! This means that in addition to our usual posts with tips on connecting with customers, marketing strategy, and growing your business, we’ll be sharing insights specifically for local salon professionals. If that includes you, it’s time to polish up on these proven promotion techniques. If not, don’t worry, we’ll still be sharing our usual resources that can help you effectively market your local business. And keep your eyes peeled, your industry might be the one we feature next month!

Check out our recent post to find out how to position your salon for success. Want your industry to be featured? Let us know!

Download The Complete Salon Marketing Checklist


promoting my salon

Finding new clients can be a constant battle for stylists. However, with all the time you already invest honing your craft and staying a cut above the latest trends and styles, there’s not much left to spend worrying about keeping your chair occupied. Getting your salon found by potential customers starts with your online presence. Following these steps when setting up your salon’s web presence can help ensure you get the most out of your efforts and drive more business.

It all starts with your business’s website:

Your salon’s website is its home base. While it’s important to have a presence on other places around the web (and more on that point in a bit!), you need to have an online asset that you own and control. That’s where your website comes in. Social pages, directories and review sites should be directing traffic back to your site. We recently partnered with Weebly for a webinar on online reputation management, where they emphasized the idea of your business’s site as a hub. Think of it in this way, and you can cultivate a community around your styling expertise.

This starts on a basic level in selecting your domain name. Make sure it represents what how salons can attract new customersyou do, as specifically as possible. When creating the various pages, be sure to emphasize these differentiators — what makes your business special, as well as the location. This helps your site get discovered when potential customers start searching for salon options in their area. Think of this process of identifying and focusing on these differentiators as the beginning of building your brand.

Include forms to capture customer data wherever possible on your site. This can be a form requesting more info on a particular service, an online appointment booking, or just a simple email form that promises to keep them updated on all the latest news. These will help you grow your email subscriber lists, and drive repeat business. And don’t forget to link to your social pages, and third-party review sites (like Yelp, Google My Business, Allure, etc.) to encourage them to engage with your salon there and check out your favorable reviews.

All of your salon’s most important information should be easily accessible on the homepage. This includes hours, address, directions (and parking info, when applicable), as well as an up-to-date list of services as well as pricing. Keep this structure in mind when building a mobile-optimized version of your site. With so many people searching for businesses on their smartphones, watches and tablets, it has become important to ensure they have a great user experience across all devices. This means fast load times as well as pages that are responsive. Make sure all this vital info is as close to the top of the page as possible, so they can easily call once they find your site. Also putting appointment forms on the homepage allows them to convert without any friction in the process.

Finally, don’t be afraid to show off a little. Including testimonials on your site can increase your conversions by 34%. Be sure to place them prominently in the upper 1/3 of the page, for the best results. This exposes potential customers to the phenomenal experience others have had at your salon and reduces any uncertainty or fears they might have over trying out a new stylist.

Keep content fresh

It’s essential to the success of your salon that you keep your business information updated. Nothing is worse than a customer coming in expecting to pay one price for a service, and finding out that the price has been increased. Even when this is unintentional (we get it, it’s normal for costs to fluctuate!), it breaks the trust or the promise that your business made when it reported on pricing on your site. Oftentimes, this new customer’s impression will be affected negatively. They’ll feel scammed and will be unlikely to return.

Similarly, you should make an effort to keep other aspects fresh for frequent visitors to your site. If you start a blog, be sure you don’t neglect it. Try to post at least once a week, and on a consistent cadence, so that your audience will know what to expect and continue to return each week looking for new tips or other insights based on your experience. And if you have special seasonal offers, make sure you change the regularly (at least once a season!). Nothing looks worse than summer specials promoted in November!

List your salon on online directories and create social profiles

Make sure that your address is formatted in the same manner in as many directories as possible. You never know which one a prospective customer might come across in their search for a new salon, so you want to be wherever your customers are! This includes review sites, so make sure you claim your profile on Yelp and Google My Business, and set them up on Allure and any other salon review sites. Yelp estimates that just by having a profile on the platform, the average business see an additional $8000 in revenue a year!

Online directories can also help with SEO efforts, which allow your website to be found by search engines. This list is a great place to start and has many free directories that you can list your business on. Again, keep your info formatted consistently throughout (as slight variations can hurt your SEO work). For example, make sure that if your salon is located at 1247 Lost Tree Lane, Suite 700, that all of your listings look the same, and none say 1247 Lost Tree Ln., Ste. 700.

Similarly, you’ll want to set up profiles on various social networks, including Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, Periscope, etc. While it’s important to be where your audience is, some businesses overcommit when it comes to their social pages. Remember, each page you set up needs to be maintained on a daily (or at least weekly) basis. Rather than having many pages with little engagement and interaction, try focusing on one or two that a majority of your existing clients are on. Or, start polling them during appointments to determine which you should concentrate on.

Familiarize yourself with the nuances of each, and be sure to interact with other users accordingly. Instagram is a great way to share before and after photos of clients (always ask for their permission before sharing anywhere publicly!). But make sure that’s not all that’s represented. Post photos of you with other stylists, different events you have and attend and any other fun, “behind the scenes” glimpses you want to give into your business. This creates a deeper connection with existing clients.

Managing Online Reputation

If you’ve followed along this far, then your salon now has an online presence! While this is great news, it also means you now need to develop a strategy for safeguarding the online reputation of your business. While review sites and social pages are great ways to expose your work to new clients, they should always be monitored in case you need to get involved. If a customer posts a negative review, be sure to reach out to them privately to see if you can find a resolution.

This is your chance to not only win them back, but also demonstrate your dedication to client satisfaction. Afterwards, you can respond to the original comment stating that you’re happy you were able to find a way to fix it, and stand by your work. Bear in mind that these are your paying clients, so do your best to keep your cool and be respectful even if they’re being unreasonable. You might not be able to win every one back, but avoid aggravating the situation at all costs. Messy public arguments have an unfortunate knack of going viral, and continue to damage businesses long after the review has been posted.

Similarly, you should do your best to seek out positive reviews from your biggest advocates. Regularly ask for feedback, and remind them how important online reviews are for your business. Add in-store signage to remind customers to check out your profiles on these sites and hopefully leave positive reviews. Don’t be afraid to email or text customers you know well and ask (politely) for them to take a minute to review you or your salon. Make it as easy as possible for them to do so by sending them the link. If you don’t get the review or a response, don’t push the same people too hard on this, but send a gentle nudge, sparingly. Always make sure to thank them when they do, and check out this full list of ideas for driving more positive reviews, and responding to negative reviews.

Communications: Email and SMS marketing strategy

Now that you’ve set up the hub of your digital presence, use SMS and email to drive traffic back to it. Include a link to your site in your email signature, as well as any links to social pages and review sites. This way no matter what type of email you send out, whether a promotion or a simple appointment confirmation, you can direct clients to check out these pages, follow your salon or even leave a positive review!

Send out emails and text messages that keep your business top-of-mind with clients between visits, and remind others that they’re due for an appointment. You can keep them informed of promotions, exclusive events, and the latest news. Between high engagement rates, and most being read almost instantaneously, SMS marketing is a great way to drum up business on a slow day. Send out a text blast offering a discount on any appointments made for that day. Or, try out any of these creative sms campaigns. Send out emails and texts that drive repeat business, reviews and referrals. As a reminder, Signpost’s Mia automates all of these initiatives so that you don’t have to manage them manually, all while protecting your reputation by intercepting negative reviews and prompting new customers to make an appointment.

Lapsed Customers: 6 Tools to Win Them Back

Customer retention. It’s one of the things that keeps business owners up at night. win inactive clients back with these toolsWhile relationship-building strategies are essential to the health and growth of a business, many find themselves ensnared in an ongoing battle against a wasteland of lapsed customers. Bain & Company has found that customer databases that are dormant over a five-year span could reach customer attrition rates as high as 50%. Identifying these inactive customers can be difficult, and reengaging them may be even trickier. Remember, it costs 4—10 times more to acquire a new customer than to retain an existing customer. Fear not, armed with these tools you can improve your chances of winning them back!

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Tanning Salons: Email and SMS Marketing Campaigns To Promote Your Business

May is Salon Month here on the Signpost Local Marketing Blog! This means that in addition to our usual posts with tips on connecting with customers, marketing strategy, and growing your business, we’ll be sharing insights specifically for local salon professionals. If that includes you, it’s time to polish up on these proven promotion techniques. If not, don’t worry, we’ll still be sharing our usual resources that can help you effectively market your local business. And keep your eyes peeled, your industry might be the one we feature next month!

Check out last week’s post to discover how to position your salon for success. Want your industry to be featured? Let us know!

Download The Complete Salon Marketing Checklist

promoting my salon


Perhaps no other salon faces off against a more daunting foe than tanning salons do with seasonality. And unlike other specializations in the industry, tanning businesses can

promoting your tanning businessalready be at a disadvantage when it comes to customer retention due to the typically solitary nature of the services. You and your staff have only a short window of interaction at the beginning and end of clients’ traditional tanning appointments in order to make an impression on them and foster the relationship. For these reasons (and many many more), it is even more essential for salon owners to put together a comprehensive communications strategy for their tanning business that makes effective use of email and SMS marketing efforts. On average, more than half of your new customers will not return, but these winning campaigns will help nurture fickle new clients by keeping your salon top-of-mind, so that you can get the most value out of this large customer base.

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Using Data To Unlock Your Business’s Growth

In our guest post series, we’ll be bringing you advice and tips from industry experts on the other, sometimes non-marketing-related issues affecting local business owners. Today’s post comes from John Keene, the founder of acuere software, the creators of serviceminder.io


When you head to the Walmarts to make a major purchase, you’ve researched the brands, the features, the costs and so you know you’re getting a good deal.

Why don’t you put that much research into running your business?

Collecting the Data

Small businesses can generate a lot of useful data through the course of just turning the crank. Sales figures, cost information and miscellaneous expenses. You’re probably already tracking all of that in QuickBooks or something similar so that, if nothing else, Is your Digital Marketing working?you can balance your checkbook and pay taxes. You can also categorize some of the data automatically using your chart of accounts. It’s important to use your chart of accounts so that you can break down different kinds of sales for comparative purposes. But don’t make too many accounts… any income accounts should see activity every month. If it doesn’t, roll that account up into something more general.

Financial data almost happens by accident because there’s not much friction – but there’s a lot more data available to collect in a typical service business.

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Salon Marketing 101: Positioning Your Salon For Success

promoting my salon

May is Salon Month here on the Signpost Local Marketing Blog! This means that in addition to our usual posts with tips on connecting with customers, marketing strategy, and growing your business, we’ll be sharing insights specifically for local salon professionals. If that includes you, it’s time to polish up on these proven promotion techniques. If not, don’t worry, we’ll still be sharing our usual resources that can help you effectively market your local business. And keep your eyes peeled, your industry might be the one we feature next month!

Want your industry to be featured? Let us know!

Download The Complete Salon Marketing Checklist


You’ve got enough on your mind when running your salon without having to worry about keeping your chairs filled. Putting together a comprehensive marketing plan can seem like a massive commitment, never mind the time it takes to execute on that strategy and stay on track. However, in order to drive new and repeat business through the door, it’s essential to be consistent with your efforts. Get started today with these tips to improve your salon’s presence and encourage more bookings.

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Bad Online Reviews — What To Do About It

A negative review is enough to take the wind out of anyone’s sails. You’ve fought hard to establish your business, and any criticisms can feel personally disparaging. More importantly, bad reviews have a real impact on your business’s health and growth. A Harvard Business School study recently found that an increase of just one star in a business’s Yelp rating can boost its revenue anywhere from 5-9%, proving that these ratings have tangible effects on your bottom line.

Fortunately, most consumers are rational people who understand that mistakes can how to respond to negative reviewshappen. They are more likely to judge a business by the way management addresses and attempts to resolve any mistake or issues their customers experience. It’s vital to act immediately, so be sure to respond to every one of these, even if you were able to sort it out with the customer via email or offline. Follow these tips in order to turn negative reviews into opportunities, not only to reengage customers that would otherwise be lost, but also to show off your dedication to customer service.

And if you are still looking for more tips on the subject, register for our upcoming webinar, presented with Weebly on Online Reputation Management.

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The first thing you should do is take a few deep breaths and collect your thoughts. It’s never a good idea to jump into a response, especially with reviews you find rude or unfair. Yelp recommends keeping the following in mind when composing responses:

  1. Your reviewers are your paying customers
  2. Your reviewers are human beings with (sometimes unpredictable) feelings and sensitivities
  3. Your reviewers are vocal and opinionated (otherwise they would not be writing reviews!)
Although it might seem impossible to forget, it’s worth mentioning that in addition to these points, even the most unfounded, unnecessarily scathing review has implications far beyond the person writing it. Even if it’s clear that you’ve lost the reviewer as a customer, their words will continue to influence countless others in search of your products or services in your area. While it might be tempting to set the record straight, do keep these potential customers in mind. If you respond in a way that comes across as harsh or rude, you will lose out big on this future business. Start by diagnosing the nature of the review.

Minor Issues:

If the review is primarily positive, but manages to call out a few small issues, it can be tempting to respond to these hiccups. However, according to a recent Cornell study that measured the impact of online reviews on hotels, after a 40% response rate, businesses reach a point of diminishing returns. The researches believe, “managers should focus on making constructive responses to negative reviews rather than simply acknowledging positive comments.” Calling out specific comments in an otherwise glowing review can be seen as being too nit-picky or aggressive.
For other small or overly complicated issues, there’s usually benefits to keeping it simple and concise. Thank them for feedback, apologize and leave it at that. If customers perceive you’re trying to make excuses for poor service or quality it can further alienate them.

Larger Issues:

For larger issues, it is even more important to reach out to the unsatisfied party, directly. Ideally, this should be done behind the scenes and out of sight of the public forum. Send an email, or private message (as is possible on some sites like Yelp), but still approach it with the same sensitivity and consideration as you would in a public venue.  Do everything you can to find a resolution and keep them as a happy customer.
87% of consumers agree that an appropriate management response to a bad review improves their impression of the business, so try to make things right, even if you don’t agree with their arguments. Keep an open mind and look for areas to improve in to avoid future mishaps. 

Don’t Cause Further Damage:

As bad as a negative review can be, things can always get worse. Getting pulled into ugly altercations with the customers you’re trying to win back will serve to further compound the effect of an already-bad review. It will serve as a warning sign to anyone in search of your business’s offering for a long time to come. Some reviewers know this and might try to test your limits. Keep a level head and make sure you don’t do anything to exacerbate the situation. The last thing you want is for them to share your heated response all over the internet, plastering it across review sites, social media and personal blogs or articles.


Contracting and Home Services Month Bonus Tip: Take advantage of longer term (and more substantive) relationships usually associated with contracting projects. Do everything in your power to check in with clients, and make sure they’re satisfied with your progress along the way. If you receive a negative review, reach out via email to attempt to find a solution. For quick house calls or servicing, make technicians more accountable. They are the face of your business, so be sure that they are incentivized to represent your business in the best light. In either instance, you should request feedback via email or SMS following the conclusion of business to gauge their satisfaction, and circumvent negative reviews. Signpost does this for your business, automatically

Don’t forget to check out other Contracting and Home Services posts!

Growing Your Flooring Business

April is Contracting and Home Services month here on the Signpost Local Marketing Blog! This means that in addition to our usual posts with tips on connecting with customers, marketing strategy, and growing your business, we’ll be sharing insights specifically for local contracting and home services professionals. If that includes you, it’s time to roll up your sleeves and get down to it. If not, don’t worry, we’ll still be sharing our usual resources that can help you effectively market your local business. And keep your eyes peeled, your industry might be the one we feature next month!

Check out other Contracting and Home Services posts!


Growing your flooring business can feel a lot like starting from the bottom. Puns aside, it can be difficult to get and maintain traction to stay top of mind with customers and promoting flooring businesspotential customers in your community. Utilize these recommendations to build a comprehensive marketing strategy that actually works for your business.  You’ll soon find that by using these methods both on and offline, you’ll be able to populate a healthy pipeline of projects to get your flooring business off the ground.

Continue Reading: 1. Decide on a specialization or focus that differentiates your offering
  1. Decide on a specialization or focus that differentiates your offering and helps you stand out to your target audience. If you’re going after hospitality contracts, then this should inform your strategy of the networking events you should attend (more trade shows and hotel industry events and conferences), and also help you identify priorities and opportunities within that market. Hotels and multi-family residences, for example, tend to be primarily motivated by affordability and pricing.Or, perhaps your offerings set you apart from the competition. Do you sell flooring but no installation services? Here, you’ll focus on the quality and diversity of materials, including the newest trends and innovations, such as environmentally friendly materials. If you provide flooring material along with installation, your potential customer will be more concerned with the process, cost and expertise of your installation experts, as well as the type of flooring they choose. Which brings us to…
  2. If you’re a full-service floorer, remember it’s about expertise. Especially for residential and commercial contracts, it’s not so much about price competition, but the professionalism and experience you and your team can offer. You’re selling a solution and customers expect your business’s installation experts to know their stuff. Make sure this is a two-way street and debrief frequently with your reps to keep your finger to the pulse of trends and customer requests, preferences etc.
  3. Create a comprehensive customer communication strategy. This should include reaching out to past and current customers via email and SMS marketing to keep them engaged and your business on their mind. Many years can pass before a past client requires more work, so make sure your business remains in front of them if and when the time comes. This way you keep a line of communication open and can remind them when they’re due for maintenance. You can also remind them to refer your business to friends and family as the need arises. Motivate them with a formal referral program or new customer discount to share, as well as seasonal promotions. Check out this full list for email and SMS Marketing ideas for home services professionals.
  4. Partner with complementary businesses to form a local coalition. Keep an eye out for businesses in your community who might have interest and be a good fit. This can include local hardware stores, painters, real estate agents, electricians, roofers, home cleaning, power washers, landscapers, interior designers, and other general contractors who don’t serve as direct competition for the products and services you offer. Hold monthly meetings to get to learn about each other’s businesses and differentiations. You can also discuss challenges members are facing and weigh in on potential solutions. This type of exchange can be very effective for tackling issues local business owners are facing. Have referrals be a cornerstone of the group and exchange print materials, such as flyers, brochures, samples and business cards so that they can share with their clients, and do the same for them.
  5. Similarly, consider joining flooring, contracting, residential and commercial building associations and obtain any accreditations (such as FITA QA) to reinforce your commitment to your craft and continued professional development.  Attend events, workshops, and meetings of your local chamber of commerce to increase credibility with customers. Use these and other networking events to meet others in the industry and keep updated on latest trends and tactics. This can also help grow your referral network and reach within your community.
  6. Host a workshop at your storefront, a hardware store or community center. Prove your expertise by teaching basic classes about flooring for homeowners or business owners. Whether these focus on the best way to clean different types of floors, using green flooring, what to consider when you need new floors, or finding the best material for your flooring project, make sure to provide value to the community. You can offer to speak on panels at trade shows or other community events. Brainstorm ways to include your local coalition in this strategy. You could provide programs that address various remodeling or home maintenance topics. Collect emails or contact info on the attendees and send them a special introductory offer, or include them on your email lists for other marketing initiatives.
  7. Use local newspapers to identify new homeowners in your area and target them with direct mail campaigns, as they are likely to be settling in and making some changes.  You can send them flyers with special “welcome offers for our new neighbors” and your business card. You can make this a part of your outreach cycle and send out mailings each quarter or twice a year, so you don’t miss out on any of these new customers.  Also try contacting owners or property managers of apartment complexes, retail plazas and residential condominiums in a similar manner and ask if you can leave some more information about your services or set up a consultation in case there should be a future need. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box when using this approach, either.  A lot of people evaluate their flooring needs when anticipating an addition to their family. Incorporate baby furniture stores to your outreach, or ask if you can leave some flyers directed towards new parents with special offers.
  8. Craft a guarantee to help you attract potential customers. This helps assuage any uncertainty or fears they might have about the process and reassures them that you are committed to providing unparalleled customer service and delivering results that will floor them (last pun, I promise). Make sure your guarantee is rooted in your company’s values. Have it clearly stated on your website, in-store and anyplace else your business has an online or offline presence. Train your representatives to recite it during any consultations, evaluations, or meetings in general. Take care to select manufacturers and distributors based on your short and long-term requirements that will allow you to stay true to your guarantee. Does a supplier that delivers direct to the customer help you streamline your logistics? Evaluate your suppliers based on this commitment.
  9. Create a process for your feedback strategy that will fuel testimonials, reviews and referrals. You can use email and SMS marketing as outlets to gather feedback after completing a project, and to encourage customers to leave you reviews on the major sites. Consider any criticism as an opportunity to continue improving your service and products. On average, for every negative comment, there are 26 other unhappy customers who have remained silent.  When you receive glowing praise, ask permission to use the quote as a testimonial that can be placed on your website and in any print or promotional materials. This can also be a good opportunity to ask them to post a review on Yelp, Facebook or Angie’s List to reinforce your online presence and positive ratings. This makes it easier for your business to be found by other potential customers. You can draft these ahead of time, so that you don’t drop the ball during busy periods, or invest in intelligent marketing technology, like Signpost, that automatically drives feedback, testimonials, reviews and referrals from your current and past customers, without you having to lift a finger! 
  10. If you’re attending trade shows, make sure your booth is stocked with plenty of samples of many of your best material options. Print out or create digital displays of your full offering, as well as slideshows with images of “before and after” projects. Bring lots of business cards, and have special brochures printed based on the type of attendee you’re targeting and even an exclusive offer for them.
  11. Keep an eye out for supplier rebate programs to help fund advertising. Some companies (like ANSO and DUPONT) will give you a resources to spend on advertising. Of course, be sure to research the terms, as they’ll usually require you to use images that showcase their products, or might even supply you with the creative, outright. This can help you advertise in traditional media (local newspapers, magazines) without investing your entire budget there.
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